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Visual Culture Lecture Series

Department of Art & Design

All events are free and open to the public

Tuesday September 10, 2019 | 6 pm | Anna Sörenson | Art Education | Montague Hall 80

Anna SorensonBorn and raised in Stockholm, Anna Sörenson received her BFA from Umeå University in Sweden. In 2012, Anna received her MFA from Pratt Institute, New York supported by her Fulbright Scholarship. 2014 she graduated from a.pass, a yearlong post-master program in performance art in Brussels, Belgium. Since 2012 she is represented by Ed Varie in New York City. She has exhibited her work in Stockholm, Brussels, Berlin, Paris, Mexico City, Miami and New York. She currently lives and works in Stockholm together with artist Daniel Rydh. They work collectively as artist duo Rydh/Sörenson and have exhibited their work in Brussels, Berlin, Faroe Islands, Spokane, Stockholm, Los Angeles and New York.

Tuesday, September 17 | 6 pm |  Emory Douglas | Graphic Design | Weber Music Hall

emory douglasEmory Douglas created the visual identity for the Black Panther Party and his iconic images came to symbolize the struggles of the movement. As the Revolutionary Artist and Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party from 1967 until the 1980s, Douglas’s work, described as ‘Militant Chic’, featured in most issues of the newspaper The Black Panther. His work was characterized by strong graphic images of young African Americans men, women and children. He used the newspaper’s popularity to spur people to action, portraying the poor with empathy and as being unapologetic and ready to struggle for basic human rights. Douglas continues to create art with social and political concerns art that transcends borders.

 

 

Tuesday, September 24, 2019 | 6 pm | Dr. Martin Berger | Art History | Montague Hall 80

dr. martin bergerDr. Berger is the dean of faculty and vice president for academic affairs at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC). Berger came to SAIC from the University of California, Santa Cruz where he was professor of the History of Art and Visual Culture and served as the Associate Vice Provost of Academic Affairs and Associate Campus Diversity Officer. In his research, Berger considers the construction of gender and race in 19th-and-20th-century US art. His most recent book, Freedom Now! Forgotten Photographs of the Civil Rights Struggle was published in 2013. His newest book project is Inventing Stereotype: Race, Arts, and 1920s America.


Tuesday, October 29, 2019 | 6 pm | Dr. Masha Zavialova | Montague Hall 80

Masha Zavialova

Born in St. Petersburg, Russia, Masha Zavialova received her doctorate from the University of Minnesota. As TMORA’s Chief Curator and Head of Exhibitions & Collections, she has curated more than fifty exhibitions at the museum. She also works on independent curatorial projects and writes for art catalogues. She is an award-winning translator of African American women writing into Russian, a co-director of the folk performance group Nitka, and a board member of the American Siberian Educational Foundation.  

Tuesday, February 25, 2020 | 6 pm | Michael Barnes | Printmaking | Montague Hall 80

Michael BarnesMichael Barnes was born in 1969 in Michigan of the United States. He grew up outside the small town of Ithaca, where his family lived on a wooded plot in the midst of farmland. This wooded plot contained a 19th century family cemetery where he spent much of his youth playing and fostering his imagination for later ventures in his artistic life.

He went on to receive his BFA from Alma College, Michigan in 1991 and his MFA from the University of Iowa in 1996, both with a focus on Printmaking. Michael developed a passion for the medium of lithography during his graduate studies at Iowa and has focused on this process for much of his work since. Michael now resides in St. Charles, Illinois, near Chicago, and is a professor of printmaking at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb.

The recent body of graphic works by Michael Barnes depicts figures that wander or are stranded within the vacuum that has been created for them by the specific world in which they exist. They are oblivious to their immediate surroundings and the menial tasks to which they are assigned or have voluntarily adopted to cope with their existence. The work addresses, in part, the destructive nature and absurdities that so readily prevail for human kind, along with themes of mortality and the philosophical questions of existence in general. The images are concerned with environment, social decay leaning towards an inward and isolated path, and cynicism about the historical evolution of so called civilization and its effects upon the world and its inhabitants.

Tuesday, April 2, 2020 | 6 pm | Christina Z. Anderson | Montague Hall 80

christina z andersonChristina Z. Anderson’s work focuses on the family snapshot, gender identity, the altered landscape, and the contemporary vanitas. Her prints are handmade in a variety of 19th century photographic processes, primarily gum and casein bichromate, salted paper, cyanotype over platinum, and mordançage. Anderson’s work has shown internationally in 100+ shows and 40+ publications. Her passion is to share the knowledge and practice of the contemporary handmade print through her publications as well as workshops throughout the United States and overseas. Anderson has authored books which have sold in 40 countries—The Experimental Photography Workbook, Gum Printing and Other Amazing Contact Printing Processes, Gum Printing, A Step by Step Manual Highlighting Artists and Their Creative Practice, and Handcrafted: The Art and Practice of the Handmade Print (the latter co-authored with Wang, Jianming, King), and Salted Paper Printing, A Step-by-Step Manual Highlighting Contemporary Artists, (2017). Anderson is Associate Professor of Photography at Montana State University, where she teaches experimental black & white and alternative process photography, as well as text & image design. She has her MFA in Photography from Clemson University, her BFA in painting and BA in photography from Montana State University, and her BA in French (summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa) from the University of Minnesota.

Tuesday, April 7, 2020 | 6 pm | Abby Haddican, Graphic Design & Kimberlee Joy Roth, Studio Ceramics (Annual Student Exhibition 2020 Jurors) | Montague Hall 80

Abby HaddicanAbby Haddican holds a B.A. in English from the University of Minnesota, and received her design education at the College of Visual Arts. Her work has been recognized by Communication Arts, the TDC, Print, AIGA 50 Books/50 Covers, AIGA Minnesota, and the Tokyo Type Directors Club, among others. When Abby’s not working, she enjoys reading, running, dance-cleaning, day-drinking, public radio, one-way feuds, practical jokes, singing in the shower, and working her fingers to the bone. Her studio is in Saint Paul, Minnesota. 

kimberlee rothKimberlee Joy Roth graduated from the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities with an MFA in Ceramics and an Art History minor in 2007. She is a 2013 McKnight Artist Fellow in Ceramics and a Fiscal Year 2016 and 2011 recipient of an Artist Initiative Grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board. Sections from her 2016 solo exhibition What We Have To Lose, at the Christensen Center Art Gallery at Augsburg College in Minneapolis, MN, will be on permanent loan at The Owatonna Arts Center, Owatonna, MN and the MacRostie Art Center, Grand Rapids, MN. Her fall 2012 solo exhibition at St. Catherine University's Catherine G. Murphy Gallery in St. Paul, MN raised $1,143 for The Algalita Marine Research Institute in Long Beach, California. Her ceramic work is in the permanent collection of the Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum in Minneapolis, MN, the Lincoln Arts and Culture Foundation in Lincoln, California and has been shown nationally in juried ceramic exhibitions. She maintains a studio in the Northeast Arts District of Minneapolis, is co-president of Minnesota Women Ceramics Artists and is the Technician for the Art and Art History Department and The Catherine G. Murphy Gallery at St. Catherine University.